Burials in the Cemetery

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The Haskell Cemetery

Annual Memorial Services, Haskell Cemetery (1913).

The Haskell Cemetery is located on the east edge of the Haskell campus. When the school, known as the United States Indian Industrial Training School, opened on September 17, 1884, officials were warned by Major Haworth, superintendent of Indian Schools, to delay the opening date. He feared that removal from their camps and change of environment in the summer heat would endanger the health of the students. The weather report for that September indicated that it was the dampest month in seventeen years; nine inches of rain fall. The pupils not only had to reckon with the elements, but with substandard living conditions, for most of the buildings were not yet ready for occupancy due to insufficient funding by the government. There was no heating system, nor a cistern, and much of the carpentry work needed in the laundry and kitchen was non-existent.

 

The first students, ranging in age from five to twenty, came from the Ottawa, Ponca, and Pawnee Agencies in Oklahoma. The next group of students arrived with their parents in a wagon train of forty-two Cheyenne and thirty-six Arapaho, none of whom could speak English. The parents chose to remain at the school because of curiosity and apprehension about leaving their children, living in stone structures without heat, without their native foods, without being able to communicate, and breathing the same dampness. Only a short time later, they watched helplessly as the conditions took their toll on the children.

 

Freezing cold followed the month-long dampness, and the unfinished buildings without heat became unbearable. But just as suddenly the cold weather was followed by warm weather; however, by this time the devastating effect on the children was quite apparent. They were suffering from exposure. After recurring cold and heat waves, by the 29th of November, one death had occurred—Harry White Wolf, a Cheyenne baby of six months. He came with the Cheyenne and Arapaho wagon train. Out of three hundred students, ten deaths from pneumonia and lung ailments were recorded that first winter.

 

During the next five years, conditions at the school worsened because of an inappropriate budget, crop failures, and devastating fires. Buildings could not be rebuilt or repaired, and equipment could not be replaced, sometimes supplies never reached the school. Sanitary conditions were appalling, for there were no sewers nor city water. Forty-nine deaths were recorded during these five years.

 

However, in 1889 conditions at the school began to improve with the investigative reports submitted to the government by Superintendent of Indian Schools, Daniel Dorchester. Money for improvements and supplies began to arrive soon after Dorchester’s investigation. Nonetheless, ten students died of pneumonia, consumption and malaria that year. By 1913 there were 102 marked graves in the cemetery. The last person to be buried in 1913 was Galeb Lew, a full-blood Ukie from the Round Valley Reservation in Covelo, California. He died from tuberculosis on July 10th. It was not until February 17, 1943, when Cecilia Mae Fiddler, a Chippewa from North Dakota, died of tuberculosis that another burial was held in the cemetery.

Haskell Cemetery after the installation of new fencing (2018).

The Haskell Cemetery is open to visitors 9 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and Federal Holidays.

Charles Adams

Pawnee

1884-1900

 

Joseph Banks

Paiute

1869-1889

 

Eugene Barber

Cheyenne

1877-1885

 

James  Beaver

Wyandotte

1876-1888

 

Maggie Big Fire

Cheyenne

1869-1887

 

Christopher Big Joe

Ottawa

1873-1891

 

Andrew Big Snake

Ponca

1872-1888

 

Chester Big Tree

Winnebago

1873-1888

 

Joseph Blackburn

Pawnee

1879-1889

 

Norman Brockey

Pawnee

1861-1885

 

Luella Bronson

Delaware

1892-1902

 

James Buell

Cheyenne

1869-1886

 

Fred Buffalo

Ponca

1869-1886

 

Willie Burnett

Potawatomi

1886-1901

 

Sophie Cadue

Kickapoo

1874-1886

 

Lena Cage

Pawnee

1881-1887

 

Martha Campbell

Seminole

1870-1888

 

Gorman Carter

Caddo

1886-1904

 

Metopo Cheauteau

Osage

1872-1888

 

Josephine Choate

Asinboin

1878-1899

 

Frank Clark

Potawatomi

1868-1885

 

George Clark

Pawnee

1875-1889

 

Lomo Congwio

Hopi

1884-1902

 

Annie Dickson

Arapahoe

1871-1890

 

Edna Eaves

Pawnee

1877-1888

 

Charlie Edge

Caddo

1879-1900

Willie Erye

Pawnee

1871-1885

 

George C. Evans

Shawnee

1882-1894

 

Cecilia Mae Fiddler

Chippewa

1923-1943

 

Willie Gibson

Caddo

1877-1888

 

John Guy

Caddo

1877-1888

 

Lee Hall

Wichita

1874-1899

 

Nellie Hand

Arapahoe

1871-1886

 

Harry Hanneno

Comanche

1868-1891

 

Willie Hanson

Winnebago

1882-1902

 

David Hanson

Digger

1890-1910

 

Webb Hayes

Pawnee

1864-1889

 

Moses Holmes

Ponca

1871-1886

 

Eberhald Howell

Pawnee

1873-1887

 

Fred Ingalls

Modoc

1878-1892

 

Ada Mohajah

Kaw

1878-1893

 

May Mohajah

Kaw

1880-1887

 

Stephen Kimball

Ponca

1868-1885

 

Lizzie King

Peoria

1868-1885

 

Jack LaForce

Osage

1880-1894

 

Cora LaFroboise

Potawatomi

1872-1885

 

Henry LeClair

Ponca

1874-1890

 

Patrick Levali

Chippewa

1889-1907

 

Caleb Lew

Ukie

1895-1913

 

Harry Little Elk

Cheyenne

1875-1888

 

John Little Eyes

N. Cheyenne

1881-1905

 

Thomas Little Wolf

Sioux

1897-1908

Chester Lone Walk

Pawnee

1869-1885

 

Job Long E.

Cherokee

1876-1901

 

Barrett Longmarsh

Winnebago

1886-1904

 

Ora Mathews

Osage

1875-1890

 

Agnes McCarty

Modoc

1870-1886

 

Bird McGuire

Osage

1869-1887

 

Guy Meachem

Pawnee

1880-1888

 

Sadie Miles

Miami

1893-1907

 

Jonah Moharty

Shawnee

1871-1891

 

John Mondoka

Potawatomi

1880-1895

 

Jesse D. Murie

Pawnee

1873-1888

 

Mary Pahmahine

Potawatomi

1893-1900

 

Charles Panther

Osage

1867-1885

 

Josiah Patterson

Pawnee

1868-1893

 

Johnson Peabody

Omaha

1892-1901

 

Peter Pearson

Pawnee

1876-1889

 

Carrie Pendleton

Cheyenne

1879-1893

 

Nettie Pequah

Kickapoo

1888-1895

 

Ambrose Pequonca

Ottawa

1874-1895

 

Arleich Perry

Chippewa

1882-1901

 

George Pishabay

Ottawa

1879-1892

 

Antonio Prieto

Mission

1895-1911

 

Charles Quein

Wyandotte

1883-1902

 

Infant son of Horace and Emma Randel

October 29, 1904

 

Charley Reynolds

Arapahoe

1871-1887

 

Agnes Ricketts

Pawnee

1881-1891

Mary Riley

Seminole

1871-1888

 

Joseph Rosseau

Chippewa

1886-1902

 

Charles Roughfeather

Sioux

1886-1904

 

Herbert Scheshewalla

Osage

1866-1886

 

Willie Sears

Sioux

1872-1888

 

Ablicio Sena

Navajo

1890-1907

 

Peter Siler

Mohave

1863-1887

 

Andrew Smith

E. Cherokee

1876-1901

 

Fred Sumner

Kaw

1877-1888

 

Adam Swamp

Oneida

1878-1892

 

Nelson Swamp

Oneida

1887-1899

 

John Taylor

Ute

1876-1902

 

Seth Thomas

Osage

1867-1885

 

Thomas Tuttle

Osage

1866-1885

 

Samuel Vallier

Quapaw

1877-1888

 

Nelson Vitolia

Papago

1883-1901

 

Susie Walker

Cheyenne

1878-1886

 

Ollie Walker

Cheyenne

1875-1886

 

Sophia Webster

Oneida

1890-1905

 

Leland Wheelock

Son of D. Wheelock

Jan. 28, 1902-Jan. 25, 1903

 

Clarence White

Pawnee

1874-1887

 

Harry White Wolf

Cheyenne

1884

 

Andrew Williams

Pawnee

1867-1885

 

Jerry Wolfchief

Cheyenne

1875-1891

 

Fred Yellow Eyes

Cheyenne

1874-1886

 

 

In addition to the 103 marked graves in the Haskell Cemetery, there are four students who are believed to be buried there, but whose graves are not marked.

 

Edward Harrold

Edward Harrold, or Wah-wah, was a full Arapaho who arrived on December 4, 1884 at the age of 19; his parent/guardian was Left Hand from Darlington, Indian Territory. Edward died on February 11, 1885 of consumption.

 

(1884-1889 Haskell Institute Registration List)

 

John Curley

John Curley, once known as Con-gee, was ¾ Potawatomi who arrived on October 28, 1884 when he was 17-years-old; We-Zo from Osage Agency, Indian Territory was his parent/guardian. John died of typho-malaria on August 23, 1886.

 

(1884-1889 Haskell Institute Registration List)

 

Jennie Lizzard

Jennie Lizzard, or Mahenoch, was 17-years-old when she arrived in September 1884. A full Arapaho, her parent/guardian was Lizzard from Darlington, Indian Territory. Jennie died of consumption on March 11, 1887.

 

(1884-1889 Haskell Institute Registration List)

 

 

Roman Harjo

"Roman Harjo, a Creek boy, aged eighteen, died last Saturday morning after an illness of only a few days. His home was at Sasakwa, Oklahoma. Although he had been in school but little and was a second grade pupil he was anxious to learn and was always quiet, obedient and studious. He would write his lessons over and over again in order to have them neat.

The funeral service was held in chapel Sunday afternoon. The choir sang appropriate selections and Dr. Wolfe’s short sermon was most earnest and impressive.

The casket was covered with beautiful flowers from a number of the boys. The burial was in the school cemetery."


(Roman Harjo Obituary, The Indian Leader, 10 February 1911, page 2.)

 

This information was taken from:

In Loving Memory of the First Haskell Students:  Haskell Cemetery Guide

Dr. Theresa Milk, 2007

For more information about the Haskell Cemetery, the individuals buried there, their stories and their experiences, we strongly recommend these books:

 

Boarding School Seasons:  American Indian Families, 1900-1940 by Brenda J. Child.

ISBN-10: 0803264054

ISBN-13: 978-0803264052

 

Haskell Institute:  19th Century Stories of Sacrifice and Survival by Dr. Theresa Milk.

ISBN-10: 0976177382

ISBN-13: 978-0976177388

 

Voices from Haskell:  Indian Students Between Two Worlds, 1884-1928 by Myriam Vuckovic.

ISBN-10: 0700616179

ISBN-13: 978-0700616176

The Haskell Cultural Center and Museum is a partner in the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area.

Haskell Cultural Center and Museum

2411 Barker Avenue

Lawrence, Kansas 66046

Phone (785) 832-6686

hinuccm@gmail.com

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